Chapman Tapped for History Seminar on “The 20th Century Presidency”

May 2017

Dr. Roger Chapman, professor of history, is one of a select group of faculty members nationwide chosen by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to participate in a special American history seminar on “The 20th Century Presidency.”

The multidisciplinary seminar for faculty members in history, political science, and related fields will explore characteristics of 20th century presidential leadership, including several individual presidents and their presidencies. From a pool of 77 highly competitive nominations, 30 faculty members were selected to participate in the seminar, which will be held July 23–27 at Stanford University’s Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Center in Washington, D.C.

In announcing the selection of participants, CIC President Richard Ekman said, “Strengthening the teaching of American history at colleges and universities is of critical importance. This seminar will provide a great opportunity for participating faculty members to gain a better understanding of effective leadership and to explore presidencies within the context of the history known then and now. We believe that Dr. Chapman will play a strong role in the seminar.”

“Dr. Roger Chapman is an experienced, and dynamic teacher at Palm Beach Atlantic who teaches history courses on American Presidents, Modern Terrorism, and the United States and the Cold War,” Dr. Robert Lloyd, dean of the School of Arts and Science, said. “He is also a thoughtful and accomplished scholar of history whose work examines such topics as counterinsurgency, the Cold War, and the Culture Wars.”

Robert Dallek, professor of history emeritus at UCLA who now teaches at Stanford in Washington, will lead the seminar. He is the author of numerous books, including Camelot’s Court: Inside the Kennedy White HouseNixon and Kissinger: Partners in PowerLyndon B. Johnson, Portrait of a President; the number one New York Times best-seller, An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917–1963; and winner of a Bancroft Prize, Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932–1945.

Seminar participants will consider presidents’ ability to handle domestic and foreign policy leadership as well as personal qualities including vision, charisma, credibility, and communication and consensus-building skills. The seminar will focus on the administrations of three 20th century presidents: Franklin D. Roosevelt’s presidency will be considered in the context of the Great Depression and World War II, John F. Kennedy’s presidency will be reviewed in the context of the Cold War, and Lyndon Johnson’s presidency will be discussed in the context of the Great Society and Vietnam.

The seminar is generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The Council of Independent Colleges is an association of 768 nonprofit independent colleges and universities and higher education affiliates and organizations that has worked since 1956 to support college and university leadership, advance institutional excellence, and enhance public understanding of private higher education’s contributions to society. CIC is the major national organization that focuses on providing services to leaders of independent colleges and universities as well as conferences, seminars, and other programs that help institutions improve educational quality, administrative and financial performance, and institutional visibility. CIC conducts the largest annual conference of college and university presidents and of chief academic officers. CIC also provides support to state associations that organize programs and generate contributions for their member colleges and universities. The Council is headquartered at One Dupont Circle in Washington, D.C.

Founded in 1994 by Richard Gilder and Lewis E. Lehrman, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History is a nonprofit organization devoted to the improvement of history education. The Institute has developed an array of programs for schools, teachers, and students that now operate in all 50 states, including a website that features more than 60,000 unique historical documents in the Gilder Lehrman Collection. Each year the Institute offers support and resources to tens of thousands of teachers, and through them enhances the education of more than a million students. The Institute’s programs have been recognized by awards from the White House, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Organization of American Historians.

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